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Louise Reviews

Crocodile Legion: A Roman Adventure

by

S.J.A.Turney & Dave Slaney

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Egypt, 117AD

There was a clang as something glinting and worth more than a year’s pay hit the floor and rolled off into a corner,

    ‘Inkaef!’

    ‘What?’

    A figure, tanned by the blazing Egyptian sun and dressed in a simple white skirt, turned in the darkness of the chamber, his torch held high.

    ‘Do we take the coffin?’

    ‘We take everything, Pashedu.’

The second figure, dressed much the same as the first, nodded in the darkness of the chamber, lit only by the flickering orange glow of three torches and the dancing reflections of that light on the gold and the gems that filled the room like the richest treasury on Earth.

    ‘I don’t want to touch the mummy, Inkaef. How can I take the coffin from around it without touching it?’

The white-skirted leader rolled his eyes, unseen in the gloom. ‘You could grow up, stop acting like a frightened baby and just do it!’

Inkaef bent back to the collection of small gold and ebony wood idols of the gods and stuffed them into the sack he held, which was already weighed down with loot.

   ‘What if we get caught?’ came another voice from near the mummy’s coffin.

   ‘Who by?’ snapped Inkaef. ‘We’re not going to get caught. Just get that coffin free and carry it outside. It’s made of enough gold to buy a small town.’

And so begins the Crocodile Legion.

Like it, you will.

Enjoy it, you will.

    Simon Turney has written this wonderfully evocative story for children aged between seven and twelve, and has used language that is both appropriate for the younger reader as well as for the older reader. The story rips along, carrying the reader through an engaging tale of danger and fear, with many light, comedic moments. Continue reading Louise Reviews

Louise’s Interview Café

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Today I would like to welcome author, Simon J. A. Turney, and illustrator, Dave Slaney, to my Interview Café.

Thank you both so much for dropping by for a chat about your up and coming book, Crocodile Legion: A Roman Adventure, it’s really lovely to see you both here.

You are my first victims… er… I mean, my first interviewees…EmoticonIconX

Welcome!

I thought I would start with the quote which can be found on amazon for, Crocodile Legion: A Roman Adventure, to give our readers some idea of what lies in store for, Marcus and Callie, the sibling protagonists.

The prefect of Egypt needs money. And the men of the 22nd Legion must brave mazes and tombs and curses and crocodile gods to get to it.

 

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Marcus and Callie, orphaned in ancient Alexandria and taken in by their uncle, the standard bearer in the legion, are about to travel up the great river Nile with the legionaries in a tense and funny adventure to grab the gold of the Pharaoh Amenemhat.

Join the legion and discover ancient Roman Egypt.

If I may start with you, Simon; the Crocodile Legion: A Roman AdventureBook 1, is an inspired piece of writing for children between the ages of seven and twelve.

The two children featured in your book are your own children, though older than they are now. So, I think my first questions for you, Simon, are these:

What gave you the idea to write Crocodile Legion, and use Marcus and Callie as your child protagonists? And, why Crocodilopolis?

Heh heh. Actually, the initial draft of Crocodile Legion included no children at all! My ever-intuitive and horribly smart agent read the draft through and told me that it was good but could be better. That it needed more of a focus for the younger reader. And at the time, I had a photo on my desk of Marcus when he was 2, dressed up for fancy dress in a toga and laurel wreath. From there it seemed natural to take my kids and put them in the tale. How could I create characters more realistic than real people, after all? The personalities of the two in the book are my children to a tee. And why Crocodilopolis? Well while researching pyramids, completely independent of this book, for the record, I came across Hawara and Herodotus’ description of the labyrinth. A labyrinth built by a crocodile obsessed pharaoh, and a city that worships the scaly monsters? Sounded too good not to use. Everything just came nicely together. Continue reading Louise’s Interview Café