When is Enough, Enough?

Researching salient points for an historical novel is a must.

But when is enough, enough?

I have just returned from my third research trip to Edinburgh, and, although I found out much that I didn’t already know, I was somewhat slack-jawed at the lack of knowledge in one particular area. I needed to know what Edinburgh Castle was like back in the late thirteenth century, and early fourteenth century, but could find no contemporary information of how it was back then.

I went to the National Library of Scotland, and could find nothing there, so then I went to Edinburgh Castle with the sure knowledge that asking at the source would bring forth the information required. It didn’t. Dumfounded, that made me stop in my tracks. What was I to do? I needed to be able to walk the metaphorical corridors of the castle, so that, in my mind’s eye I could see my characters playing their part. I asked this question in a group that I’m an admin in, The Review. Answers came thick and fast, and it was a great discussion, with suggestions on how to deal with the lack of information. All duly noted, and appreciated; and I will utilise their information. But, I was still perplexed as to why there was no information about the castle in the time period in which I was particularly interested.

I have a book, Fortress of the Kingdom – Archaeology and Research at Edinburgh Castle, by Gordon Ewart and Dennis Gallagher, Archaeology Report #7, and published through Historical Scotland. It’s a wonderful book, with pictures and diagrams of relevant archaeology done over time. There are drawings, which are colour coded to show which parts were built in which time. For example, a mustard colour shows what was built in the years 1050-1300, and a dark sage green shows what was built in 1300-1450; see image below. “Great!” says I, only to find no evidence for the first time period, and scant evidence for the second time period. Back to the drawing board. Continue reading When is Enough, Enough?

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